7 Tips for Picky Eaters

Although I am not a mother myself, I have babysat for years and lived with my baby cousins for some time. Below are tips for picky eaters from my experience as well as ones from our readers, family, and friends who are parents. Do you have tips for picky eaters? Share them in the comments below!

Rose and Pistachio White Chocolate Bark from  Now, Forager

Rose and Pistachio White Chocolate Bark from Now, Forager

Try a rainbow snack or treat! Colour variety is often a good indication of nutritious produce & kids love bright colours. Here are a few recipes you can try:

Go tiny: Even for older kids, sometimes smaller-cut bites helps them tackle foods one by one rather than one intimidating plop.

Change up containers: Sometimes the colour of the food is the problem before even trying it out, so try serving a green smoothie flavoured with their favourite fruit  in a solid reusable cup with a lid & straw.

Allow them to top a new food, like salmon, with a food they love. A Michelin star chef might not add ketchup to it, but it doesn’t mean your kid can’t if it encourages them to explore

Embrace the magic of breading, which we love doing with Celiac-friendly option of gluten-free breadcrumbs or even crushed Macadamia nuts for fish sticks. We recommend this recipe!

Let them tell you two foods they don’t want to eat! Even adults have a few foods they don’t care for. Let everyone in the family pick a set number of foods they’re allowed to pass on but everything else needs to be tried. And if someone wants to add a new food to the “no-eat” list, they need to swap in trying a new food.

Use a bento box: Food that is organised into cute little compartments often entice picky eaters to try foods that are out of their usual comfort zone. Check out this article for tips on packing a bento box and using fun shapes to further encourage them.



help-picky-eaters-eat

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Almila Kakinc-Dodd is the Founder, Editor-in-Chief of The Thirlby. She is also the author of the book The Thirlby: A Field Guide to a Vibrant Mind, Body, & Soul. She is currently pursuing her Master’s in Nursing as a Dean’s Scholar at Johns Hopkins University. Her background is in Anthropology & Literature, which she has further enriched through her Integrative Health Practitioner training at Duke University. She lives in the Washington, D.C. Metro Area, where she regularly contributes to various publications. She is a member of Democratic Socialists of America and urges others to join the movement.